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Online webinar discussing data & analysis from a programme of ethnographic research that critically explores procedural justice theory.

UCL Department of Security and Crime Science


Title: From Coercion to Consent: Police Ethnography and Procedural Justice

Date: Monday 15th February 2021, 2pm - 4pm

Location: Zoom details provided after registration

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About this Event

Procedural Justice Theory proposes that where ‘citizens’ perceive fairness in police practice, they are more likely to experience their relationship to the police as legitimate and comply with the law. There are four factors which are generally understood to be central to achieving procedurally fair encounters: a) trust in the motives of the police, b) dignity and respect, c) voice or participation and d) neutrality. Such encounters are then assumed to incline citizens to respond with greater levels of compliance, respect, and cooperation.

In this symposium we discuss data and analysis from an ESRC funded programme of ethnographic research that critically explores these PJT based assumptions. In the first session we will discuss the theoretical rationale for our research. We then present three empirical papers from the project all of which derive from a programme of ethnographic observations and interviews that the project has enabled.

The first reports on key conclusions from a thematic analysis of interviews exploring the psychology and understandings that police officers take into their routine encounters with citizens. The second reports on a series of observations of police citizen encounters within the custody suites of a large metropolitan force in the UK. The final empirical paper then reports upon data gathered from over one hundred and eighty hours of ethnographic research on the policing of a highly marginalised street population in and around North London.

Taken together the papers analyse the situated and group level nature of police citizen encounters and further explores some of the complexities of their procedural fairness. We conclude the session with a discussant who will pull together the four papers and explore their central implications for theory, policy, and practice

 

For Speaker info and registration click here

Abgerundetes Rechteck: For Speaker info and registration click here

 

Newest AIC publications: Corporate crime in Australia: The extent of the problem (Dec 2020)

Published Date

08-12-2020

Trends & issues in crime and criminal justice

Author(s): Bartlett, DavidRansley, JanetForrester, LucyMiddendorp, Kristine

Abstract

Government and public concern about corporate wrongdoing in Australia is arguably at an all-time high. However, the extent and nature of corporate crime is largely unknown; it is concealed by regulatory agency reporting practices and the absence of a single data source which combines data across all regulators. This study addresses the problem by examining corporate offending by 33 of the country’s top companies, and their wholly owned subsidiaries, over a five-year period. The results indicate that corporate offending is patterned and unevenly distributed across the business community. Drawing on the findings and on their experience of conducting the research, the authors make recommendations for improving policy and practice, including the establishment of a national database of corporate offending.


Corporate crime in Australia: The extent of the problem (Dec 2020)

 

Webinar: INSPIRE: Seven strategies for ending violence against children training series: NORMS AND VALUES

When: Feb 5, 2021 15:30 – 17:00 Amsterdam, Berlin, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna
Topic: INSPIRE: Seven strategies for ending violence against children training series: NORMS AND VALUES

Register in advance for this webinar:

https://who.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_tCdcHHkxQRWGBFthm29dNQ

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Proceedings will start punctually at 15h30 and the Zoom link will be open as of 15h15 to enable everyone to get online in time.

Speakers include: Greta Massetti (US CDC), Yvette Kabale (Raising Voices Uganda), Suruchi Sood (Drexel University) and Dean Peacock (TBC). The webinar will be moderated by Nicolas Makharashvilli (Columbia University).  

 

Download (pdf)

EUCPN: Crime prevention - a European definition

The EUCPN defines crime prevention as:

Ethically acceptable and evidence-based activities aimed at reducing the risk of crime occurring and its harmful consequences with the ultimate goal of working towards the improvement of the quality of life and safety of individuals, groups and communities

The paper covers this definition in depth, offering information on the different aspects within our understanding of crime prevention.

 

Download Documents

Paper: Crime prevention - a European definition1.3 MB

Factsheet: Crime prevention - a European definition3.5 MB

EUCPN Multiannual Strategy 2021-2025

The crime prevention field is and remains a complex field to navigate. The European Crime Prevention Network  has gathered a wealth of information and made this available to policy makers and practitioners alike. The EUCPN aims to be the most accessible network possible in leading evidence-based crime prevention and acting as facilitator of best practices at the European, national and local level.

The multiannual strategy provides the overarching framework for ensuring, first, that the EUCPN’s work reflects the needs of the crime prevention field. This part contains one strategic goal and four operational goals to accomplish this. Secondly, the strategy will ensure that the EUCPN’s activities are supported by an efficient internal structure that adopts a proactive approach to planning, promotes appropriate and efficient working practices, and ensures that core processes are optimised. Four areas of improvement have been
identified to improve the internal functioning.

 

Adopted by EUCPN Board on 2 December 2020

 

Download Documents

EUCPN Multiannual Strategy 2021-2025160.28 KB

London Policing Seminar Series 2021:Police perspectives on policing the pandemic

by UCL JDI Institute for Global City Policing

The first seminar will be held this Wednesday 3rd February 2021 1400-1600 GMT:

Police perspectives on policing the pandemic

Speakers:

  • Assistant Chief Constable Owen Weatherill – NPoCC
  • Sarah Charman, Camille Ilett, Geoff Newiss, and Paul Smith – University of Portsmouth
  • Arabella Kyprianides – IGCP, University College London

 

This seminar is free and open to all. For registration and further details please click here.

 

For details of the other upcoming seminars please click here.

 

New reports show how outlaw motorcycle gangs in Australia are changing

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New reports show how outlaw motorcycle gangs in Australia are changing


The changing culture of outlaw motorcycle gangs in Australia

  • First hand insights from former members show how some clubs are recruiting younger members who are more criminally-inclined, self-interested and financially motivated.
  • These changes have resulted in more conflict and less loyalty between members, which was an important motive for leaving clubs.


Effects of outlaw motorcycle gang membership and the support needs of former members

  • Negative effects of outlaw motorcycle gang involvement included poor mental health, the breakdown of relationships, and problems finding legitimate employment.
  • The research was used by Queensland Police Service to develop a new intervention model to prevent recruitment and support former members to reduce gang involvement.

 

 

The reports are available for free download on the AIC website.

 

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New AIC report examines the production and distribution of child sexual abuse material

A systematic review of the literature shows that:

  • There is an overlap between child sexual abuse and child sexual abuse material (CSAM) production and distribution. Those with a history of child contact sexual offending are more likely to have produced CSAM.
  • CSAM offenders are commonly known to their victims and are likely to be family members or acquaintances. It is less common that CSAM offenders meet their victims online or are strangers.
  • Traditionally, offenders have accessed and distributed CSAM through P2P networks and websites, but the advent of new technologies have provided new opportunities for sharing CSAM.

 

The report is available for free download on the AIC website: https://www.aic.gov.au/publications/tandi/tandi617

AIC Media release - New study reveals those most at risk of physical and sexual violence by a partner during the COVID-19 pandemic

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MEDIA RELEASE


New study reveals those most at risk of physical and sexual violence by a partner during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC) has today released a paper that describes the characteristics of women who were more likely to experience physical and non-physical forms of domestic violence from their partner during the initial stages of the COVID-19 pandemic.

This study involved the analysis of survey data collected from more than 9,000 Australian women who were asked about their experiences of domestic violence during the initial stages of the COVID-19 pandemic (February-May 2020).  

Results showed that 4.2 per cent of women had experienced physical violence from a cohabiting partner, while 5.8 per cent had experienced coercive control. It also reveals some Australian women were much more likely than others to have experienced physical or sexual violence and/or coercive control during the initial stages of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Compared to the rest of the population, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, pregnant women, women with a long-term restrictive health condition, women from non-English speaking backgrounds and younger women were more likely to experience physical or sexual violence or coercive control in the three months prior to the survey.

AIC Research Manager and co-author Hayley Boxall said the findings highlight the uneven distribution of domestic violence across the Australian community and shows a need to provide more focused support for those in higher risk groups.

“This study shows that some Australian women were much more likely than others to have experienced physical or sexual violence and/or coercive control during the initial stages of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Many of the reasons why these groups were vulnerable to experiencing domestic violence were present before the pandemic, but may have become worse during this period.

“This includes things like barriers to accessing services, social isolation and financial stress.

“These findings highlight the need for proactive outreach services to support vulnerable women during disasters like the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Ms Boxall

The report is available at www.aic.gov.au

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Copyright © 2019 Australian Institute of Criminology, All rights reserved.



Our mailing address is:

Australian Institute of Criminology

GPO BOX 1936

Canberra City, ACT 2601

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MEDIA RELEASE


New study reveals those most at risk of physical and sexual violence by a partner during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC) has today released a paper that describes the characteristics of women who were more likely to experience physical and non-physical forms of domestic violence from their partner during the initial stages of the COVID-19 pandemic.

This study involved the analysis of survey data collected from more than 9,000 Australian women who were asked about their experiences of domestic violence during the initial stages of the COVID-19 pandemic (February-May 2020).  

Results showed that 4.2 per cent of women had experienced physical violence from a cohabiting partner, while 5.8 per cent had experienced coercive control. It also reveals some Australian women were much more likely than others to have experienced physical or sexual violence and/or coercive control during the initial stages of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Compared to the rest of the population, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, pregnant women, women with a long-term restrictive health condition, women from non-English speaking backgrounds and younger women were more likely to experience physical or sexual violence or coercive control in the three months prior to the survey.

AIC Research Manager and co-author Hayley Boxall said the findings highlight the uneven distribution of domestic violence across the Australian community and shows a need to provide more focused support for those in higher risk groups.

“This study shows that some Australian women were much more likely than others to have experienced physical or sexual violence and/or coercive control during the initial stages of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Many of the reasons why these groups were vulnerable to experiencing domestic violence were present before the pandemic, but may have become worse during this period.

“This includes things like barriers to accessing services, social isolation and financial stress.

“These findings highlight the need for proactive outreach services to support vulnerable women during disasters like the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Ms Boxall

The report is available at www.aic.gov.au

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Copyright © 2019 Australian Institute of Criminology, All rights reserved.

Please see our Privacy Policy at https://aic.gov.au/privacy-0

Our mailing address is:

Australian Institute of Criminology

GPO BOX 1936

Canberra City, ACT 2601

Australia


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AICís new podcast series CrimPod is out now!


AIC’s new podcast series CrimPod is out now!


Introducing the Australian Institute of Criminology’s brand-new podcast series, CrimPod. You can now listen to the latest AIC research on a range of contemporary crime and justice issues affecting Australia.

Podcasts have become increasingly popular and the launch of CrimPod is a welcome addition to sit alongside AIC’s schedule of publications, seminars and popular YouTube channel—CriminologyTV.

In the series, podcast host and AIC Deputy Director Dr Rick Brown, interviews AIC and external authors/researchers, discussing the methodology and findings of their research.

The first episode of CrimPod looks into women’s experiences of domestic violence in Australia during the initial COVID-19 pandemic period.

This episode offers brilliant analysis and information-rich conversation as Dr Brown talks to AIC research managers Hayley Boxall and Anthony Morgan about their latest research.

If you’re looking for informed discussion, relatable commentary and the latest research on crime and justice, subscribe to CrimPod on your favourite podcasting platform: https://crimpod.buzzsprout.com/

 

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Copyright © 2020 Australian Institute of Criminology, All rights reserved.
Please see our Privacy Policy at https://www.aic.gov.au/privacy-0

AIC Media
media@acic.gov.au



 


AIC’s new podcast series CrimPod is out now!


Introducing the Australian Institute of Criminology’s brand-new podcast series, CrimPod. You can now listen to the latest AIC research on a range of contemporary crime and justice issues affecting Australia.

Podcasts have become increasingly popular and the launch of CrimPod is a welcome addition to sit alongside AIC’s schedule of publications, seminars and popular YouTube channel—CriminologyTV.

In the series, podcast host and AIC Deputy Director Dr Rick Brown, interviews AIC and external authors/researchers, discussing the methodology and findings of their research.

The first episode of CrimPod looks into women’s experiences of domestic violence in Australia during the initial COVID-19 pandemic period.

This episode offers brilliant analysis and information-rich conversation as Dr Brown talks to AIC research managers Hayley Boxall and Anthony Morgan about their latest research.

If you’re looking for informed discussion, relatable commentary and the latest research on crime and justice, subscribe to CrimPod on your favourite podcasting platform: https://crimpod.buzzsprout.com/

 

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Website

 

 

 

Copyright © 2020 Australian Institute of Criminology, All rights reserved.
Please see our Privacy Policy at https://www.aic.gov.au/privacy-0

AIC Media
media@acic.gov.au

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New AIC Publication: New research reveals role of parents in producing child sexual abuse material (CSAM)

  • CSAM produced and distributed by parents and/or parental figures most often involved a male parent - 52 percent of cases involved biological fathers and 41 percent involved a stepfather, a parent’s partner or a foster father.
  • The victim’s biological mother was involved in 28 percent of cases.
  • Victims were predominately girls under nine years of age.
  • The study identified distinct patterns and scenarios of parental CSAM offending that can inform prevention, early intervention and improved responses to victims.

 

The report is available for free download on the AIC website: https://www.aic.gov.au/publications/tandi/tandi616

 

Copyright © 2021 Australian Institute of Criminology, All rights reserved.

New AIC Publication: Research conducted for the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability reveals that

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  • Women with a restrictive long-term health condition were more likely to experience physical or sexual violence and/or coercive control in the three months prior to the survey than women who did not have a long-term health condition.
  • Relative to the rest of the female population, women with a restrictive long-term health condition were also more likely to report the onset of violence or coercive control.
  • The violence they experienced typically increased in frequency or severity compared with the six-month period prior to February 2020.

 
The report is available for free download on the AIC website: https://www.aic.gov.au/publications/sr/sr32

 

Copyright © 2021 Australian Institute of Criminology, All rights reserved.

Webinar: INSPIRE: Seven strategies for ending violence against children training series: NORMS AND VALUES

When: Mar 2, 2021 14:30 – 16:00 Amsterdam, Berlin, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna
Topic: INSPIRE: Seven strategies for ending violence against children training series: PARENT AND CAREGIVER SUPPORT

 

Register in advance for this webinar: https://ddei5-0-ctp.trendmicro.com:443/wis/clicktime/v1/query?url=https%3a%2f%2fbit.ly%2f3kffSNT&umid=64C16F19-BC02-7205-B235-904731F6F66E&auth=16810d2690abb50d7e46cffa522be3cd2b384ad1-00543074303a47975b3842196b461f34498d3958

 

 

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Proceedings will start punctually at 14h30 and the Zoom link will be open as of 14h15 to enable everyone to get online in time.

Speakers include: Dr Wadih Maalouf (UNODC), Dr Jamie M. Lachman (University of Oxford), Beatrice Ogutu (Investing in Children and their Societies) and Dr Aala El-Khani (UNODC). 

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Webinar: Police Perspectives on policing the pandemic

1

 

Online webinar "What do you think about how the police should use big data and machine learning?"

 

   

   

                                                                    

   

The UCL Institute for Global City Policing and Canterbury Centre for Policing Research at Canterbury Christ Church University are pleased to invite you to the second event of their joint seminar online series

    

Title:

Date: Wednesday 3rd March,

Location: Zoom details provided after registration

Register Here

 

The debate over how the police are using big data, algorithms and machine learning is intensifying. It is considered in some quarters as controversial as stop and search and has been criticised for being discriminatory towards black and minority ethnic groups, and for having marginal effects on reducing crime. The police use of machine learning algorithms has also been condemned by human rights groups who claim such programmes encourage racial profiling and discrimination along with threatening privacy and freedom of expression.

 

Machine learning has been used successfully in many industries to create efficiency, prioritise risk and improve decision making. Although they are at a very early stage, the police in the UK are exploring the benefits of using big data and machine learning methods to prevent and detect crime, and to develop new insights to tackle problems of significant public concern. These activities are controversial and, in a democratic society, should be part of the public conversation about policing in the UK.

 

In this seminar, from both an academic and practical perspective, leading researchers in the field provide a critical reflection on the use of data, algorithms and machine learning in policing. The seminar will discuss three broad questions: how can the police use data, algorithms and machine learning lawfully and ethically? how can their use be transparent, explainable and accountable? and does their use by the police need to be regulated by new policy and oversight mechanisms?"

 

The format for the event will be as follows:

 

2.00 - 2.10pm: Opening and introduction - Prof Steve Tong - CCCU

 

2.10 - 2.30pm: Alexander Babuta - "Data analytics and algorithms in policing”

 

2.35 - 2.55 pm: Dr Bennett Kleinberg - "Will crime science become data science?”

 

3.00 - 3.20pm: Detective Superintendent Andy Featherstone - "Evidence Based Investigative Tool (EBIT): A Framework for the legitimate application of statistical triage for volume crime”

 

3.25 - 3.45pm: Giles Herdale – “‘Embedding ethics into police use of technology”

 

3.45 - 4.00pm: Panel and questions facilitated by Steve

 

UCL Department of Security and Crime Science

New AIC research reveals extent of criminal mobility across state and territory borders among Australian outlaw motorcycle gangs

  • Around 1 in 10 outlaw motorcycle gang members in Australia have offended across more than one jurisdiction.
  • Criminally mobile outlaw motorcycle gang members are highly concentrated in a small number of chapters.
  • Patterns of criminal mobility among outlaw motorcycle gang members primarily involve movements into New South Wales and Queensland.

 

The report is available for free download on the AIC website: https://www.aic.gov.au/publications/tandi/tandi619

EUCPN: An integrated approach to family-based crime

Did you know that crime sometimes runs in families? Family-based crime is complex and diverse, so how can it be prevented?
Find out in our toolbox, which consists of three papers and is now translated in French and German:
- Theoretical background: translates what we know about family-based crime into a theoretical basis for prevention
- Effective prevention: lists seven different types of preventive interventions
- European Crime Prevention Award 2020
Read our toolbox