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UNODC: Education as a tool to preventing crime and promoting a culture of lawfulness

13 February 2017 - The integration of crime prevention and criminal justice into all levels of education is essential in building long-term approaches to countering crime and violence. It is also critical in ensuring that the rule of law is respected from an early age in order to build safe and prosperous societies for all. Recognizing this, the Doha Declaration, adopted at the 13th United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice, highlighted the fundamental importance of universal education for children and youth to prevent crime, terrorism and corruption and promote sustainable development. To put the Doha Declaration into reality, an ambitious Global Programme was launched last year with the financial support of the State of Qatar, which includes an innovative and comprehensive educational initiative: 'Education for Justice' (E4J). An interactive session on primary education at the Expert Group Meeting for the Education for Justice (E4J) initiativeAs part of the development of E4J, a series of Expert Group Meetings are currently underway in Vienna, bringing together experts with a variety of backgrounds from across Governments (including Ministries of Education), civil society, academia, the private sector and international organizations, combining a rich spectrum of experiences. Their areas of expertise range from education (teaching and curriculum development) to UNODC's mandate areas (corruption, terrorism, criminal justice, and organized crime, including cybercrime) With a focus on three levels of education - primary, secondary and tertiary - the meetings are being held over the course of February and March. At the primary level, E4J aims to develop and support interactive and innovative tools to foster integrity and skills from an early age for solving basic moral and ethical dilemmas; at the secondary level, the initiative will promote an understanding of the basic concepts that lie at the core of UNODC's work; while for universities, teaching and research on issues related to the UNODC-mandated areas will be facilitated and promoted, including corruption, organized crime, trafficking in persons, smuggling of migrants, terrorism, cybercrime, criminal justice and arms trafficking, as well as on integrity and ethics. Candice Welsch, from UNODC's Corruption and Economic Crime Branch, on the primary education Expert Group Meeting. Photo: UNODCNoting this, Candice Welsch from UNODC's Corruption and Economic Crime Branch, opened the primary education Expert Group Meeting: "Education is broadly recognized as a tool to promote peace, justice and equality for sustainable development. It has a major role to play in shaping the values of future generations, building collective consciousness, reshaping societal preferences and complementing this with the necessary skills to enact these values." She also elaborated how E4J is connected to the Sustainable Development Goals, specifically SDG target 4.7, which calls for Member States to engage in education on the promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence. John Brandolino, UNODC Director of the Division for Treaty Affairs. Photo: UNODCThe secondary level event was opened by John Brandolino, UNODC Director of the Division for Treaty Affairs, who conveyed the importance of building resilience among children and youth through carefully targeted and comprehensive educational programmes that actively involve young people and all relevant stakeholders. "E4J focuses on certain aspects of education that are meant to cultivate critical thinking skills among youth and build an awareness that crime is bad and harmful to society. This, in turn, should inspire individuals to abstain from criminal activities and also instil support for societal efforts to prevent and address all types of crime."

UNODC: UNODC provides Nelson Mandela Rules guidance to States to improve prison management

10 February 2017 - Following the development of guidance material on the management of violent extremist prisoners and on prison-based rehabilitation programmes, UNODC's Justice Section hosted today more than 30 senior level prison officials from around the world, together with representatives from prison inspection mechanisms and other relevant partners, in order to review a checklist which will assist Member States in assessing compliance with The United Nations Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners ("the Nelson Mandela Rules"). The adoption by the General Assembly of the Nelson Mandela Rules in December 2015 represented a landmark achievement for the international normative framework applicable to prison management. "The hard work which Member States and other partners invested into this process has ensured the continued relevance of prison rules in the 21st century", noted Mr. Aldo Lale-Demoz, UNODC's Deputy Executive Director, during the opening": "It has also created a new - and very much needed - international spotlight on prison conditions, management and the treatment of prisoners. I think we can all agree that safe prisons promote human rights, advance the right to health and contribute to communities safe from crime". The Nelson Mandela rules also form the normative cornerstone of UNODC's new Global Programme on Addressing Prison Challenges, which was launched to build on this momentum for prison reform. Forming part of this programme, this week's Expert Group was convened to assist national prison administrations in assessing and improving compliance of prison management with the rules in practice. More specifically, experts worked on refining a checklist which can serve either (i) as a basis for newly established internal inspection mechanisms in prison administrations, or (ii) as a tool for revising existing inspection methods and tools in line with international minimum standards. As such, the meeting directly responded to one specific innovation in the rules, namely the need for a two-fold system of external (independent) and internal inspections of prisons and penal services. Numerous Member States have indeed started with reviewing their prison laws and policies in light of the Nelson Mandela Rules. The Correctional Service convened a high-level consultative meeting, in December 2016, in Zambia. Photo: UNODCIn Zambia, for example, the Correctional Service convened a high-level consultative meeting in December 2016 to review the national Prison Act with a view to incorporate key provisions of the UN Standard Minimum Rules. The event, organized with the support of UNODC, was opened by Chileshe Mulenga, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Home Affairs, who highlighted that "our aspiration is to make sure we have a Zambia that observes and respects the rights of all human beings within her borders; including those in prisons". He further observed that prisons were not meant to punish but to reform people, so that they can also contribute to national development once released. A key objective is to change the mindset of correctional staff from a regimental/punitive culture to a correctional model. In light of this focus on staff training and as an immediate form of support, UNODC shared with the Zambia Correctional Staff Training College its extensive series of prison management handbooks and curricula. UNODC's Expert Group Meeting in Vienna, supported by the Government of Germany, included a presentation by representatives from Algeria, Brazil, Thailand and the U.S., who elaborated on the internal inspection systems in place in their national prison systems. Furthermore, the attendance of representatives from the United Nations Sub-Committee on the Prevention of Torture and the International Committee of the Red Cross, amongst others, also ensured a constructive exchange with mechanisms and organizations in charge of independent inspections, or which have extensive experience in visiting prisons around the world. Looking beyond this initiative, Thabo Pitswani, Minister Plenipotentiary from the Permanent Mission of South Africa, used the opening of the meeting to reiterate that it would champion the formation of a Vienna-based Group of Friends of the Nelson Mandela Rules. "I would like to reaffirm South Africa's commitment to remain actively engaged in promoting awareness of the rules and to support their practical application in Member States", said Mr. Pitswani. Such Group would provide for a permanent forum to promote the application of the rules, in order to strengthen UNODC's technical support in the field of prisons reform and to facilitate consultations of interested Member States on the different aspects related to prison management. The Group is also planned to facilitate the widest possible involvement of Member States and other stakeholders in the annual marking of Nelson Mandela International Day (18 July) by promoting humane conditions of imprisonment.

Call for abstracts for EUSPR 2017 in Vienna is now open

Call for abstracts for EUSPR 2017 in Vienna is now open.

They welcome submissions on all prevention science topics.  They  also encourage presentations that focus on improving the use of evidence in policy and practice, and welcome submissions from delegates outside of academia (such as policy makers, practitioners, and advocates) who have an interest in prevention.

 

PhD scholarships and Open Evening for crime and security PhDs at UCL - March 14th 6pm

PhD scholarships and Open Evening for UCL Security Science Doctoral Training Centre (UCL SECReT) Date: Tuesday, 14 March 2017, 6pm-8pm Venue: Lecture Theatre G22, UCL Pearson Building (North Easton Entrance), University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT Each year UCL SECReT organises an open evening at which prospective students of the course can come along and learn more about the programme. The open evening includes presentations by programme leaders about the vision and goals of the centre, the modules involved in the course, our areas of research, and the wider activities that students will participate in as part of their four-year training programme, and also the application and scholarship award process. Students will be able to meet course academics and current students from the programme.

European Commission - Statement by Commissioner Jourová on the European Day for victims of crime

Brussels, 22 February 2017 On the European Day for Victims of Crime, Commissioner for Justice, Consumers and Gender Equality, Vera Jourová, said: "Every year across the EU, around 1 in 7 people fall victim to crime. All victims of crime need to be treated with dignity and given the support and protection they need. My message to them is: Europe is on your side. The Victims' Rights Directive, which gives all victims of crime across Europe the right to protection, assistance and support, should have been in place in all Member States over a year ago. But rights are not enough if they are not applied in practice. I call once again on all Member States that have not yet transposed the Victims' Rights Directive into their national legislation to do so without further delay. Last week, new rules were adopted to better protect victims of terrorism. They will ensure that victims of terrorism will receive the protection, advice and support they need, wherever they are in Europe, immediately following an attack and for as long as necessary. This year, I'd like to focus on women. One in three has experienced some form of gender-based violence in their lifetime. Female victims of any form of violence should not be blamed for what has happened to them. This is why the Commission launched a campaign in 2017 to raise awareness on this issue. I want these women to know that they can go to the authorities and be heard by police, prosecutors and judges, all trained to listen to them. They should feel safe during a trial and feel protected from the offender outside the courtroom. They should also have access to support services tailored to their individual needs. Violence, whatever its nature, is a violation of our European values and fundamental rights. We must fight it together and give its victims all the support they need to rebuild their lives."

UCL Department of Security and Crime Science: Europol Lecture

Date: Thursday 2nd March 201 Pre-presentation drinks reception: 16:30 Presentation: 17:00 followed by Q&A session The Department of Security and Crime Science and the Organised Crime Research Network are pleased to announce a special presentation as part of its programme of work around tackling organised crime and terrorism. Mr Wainwright was appointed Director of Europol in April 2009. He was reappointed for a second term in 2013, having overseen Europol’s transition from intergovernmental organisation to EU agency status in 2010, ensured Europol’s pivotal position in the new EU Policy Cycle for serious and organised crime from 2011, and secured the establishment of the European Cybercrime Centre (EC3) at Europol in 2013. Under his command Europol has also established the new European Counter Terrorism Centre and European Migrant Smuggling Centre, both in 2016. As the EU’s law enforcement agency, Europol has a mission to support its Member States in preventing and combatting all forms of serious international organised crime and terrorism. In his presentation Rob Wainwright will provide a number of insights into the daily workings of Europol and how it works with member states. Mr. Wainwright will also provide topical and timely commentary on the impact of Brexit on the UKs relationship with Europol and the implications for collective security. This invitation is open to all members of the Department of Security and Crime Science and invited guests.

Current migration situation in the EU: separated children - December 2016

Although official figures on the phenomenon are lacking, it is clear that children arriving in the European Union (EU) are often accompanied by persons other than their parents or guardians. Such children are usually referred to as ‘separated’ children. Their identification and registration bring additional challenges, and their protection needs are often neglected. On arrival, these children are often ‘accompanied’, but the accompanying adult(s) may not necessarily be able, or suitable, to assume responsibility for their care. These children are also at risk of exploitation and abuse, or may already be victims. Their realities and special needs require additional attention. The lack of data and guidance on separated children poses a serious challenge. This focus section outlines the specific protection needs of separated children, and highlights current responses and promising practices among EU Member States.

TRANSPARENCY INTERNATIONAL: Corruption Perceptions Index 2016

Corruption and inequality feed off each other, creating a vicious circle between corruption, unequal distribution of power in society, and unequal distribution of wealth. As the Panama Papers showed, it is still far too easy for the rich and powerful to exploit the opaqueness of the global financial system to enrich themselves at the expense of the public good. Based on expert opinion from around the world, the Corruption Perceptions Index measures the perceived levels of public sector corruption worldwide. The findings are less than encouraging. Not a single country comes close to top marks, while over 120 countries score below 50 on the scale of 0 (highly corrupt) to 100 (very clean). This means less than a third of countries are even above the midpoint. Corruption hurts all countries. In our index’s lower-scoring countries, people frequently face situations of bribery and extortion, rely on basic services that have been undermined by the misappropriation of funds, and confront official indifference when seeking redress from authorities that are on the take. In higher-scoring countries the situation may seem less obvious in the daily lives of citizens, but closed-door deals, illicit finance, and patchy law enforcement exacerbate many forms of corruption at home and abroad. “We do not have the luxury of time,” says Ugaz. “Corruption needs to be fought with urgency, so that the lives of people across the world improve”.

Preventing and Countering Discriminatory Violence

European seminar 2-3 March 2017, Vienna According to recent reports by European institutions and civil society organisations, incidents motivated by hate and intolerance are increasing in number and intensity in many EU member states. While this is a trans-national phenomenon, responses must be found at all levels of governance. Local authorities can play a particularly important role in terms of prevention and awareness-raising and contribute to creating a climate where discrimination, hate speech and violence are not acceptable. To discuss this pressing topic, Efus invites you to a public European seminar on countering discriminatory violence and hate crime at the local level. Representatives of local authorities, European institutions, civil society organisations and other experts will discuss local approaches and strategies to counter hate and intolerance and exchange examples of best practices. The seminar includes presentations by well known experts who work on anti-discrimination and hate crime, panel discussions with representatives of European institutions, workshops on best practices by local practitioners, and field visits of some of the front line projects currently underway in Vienna to prevent hate crime.

EFRJ Summer School 2017 Restorative Justice

Como 24-28/07/2017 EFRJ Summer School 2017 The EFRJ summer school will take place at the University of Insubria (Como, Italy) on 24-28 July 2017! The focus will be on the use of RJ in cases of serious crimes. Register before 30 April to benefit from the reduced fee!!! A brief historical note on the EFRJ Summer School Every two years, the EFRJ organises a Summer School in a different location in Europe and on a different theme. After the EFRJ’s foundation in 2000, the EFRJ Summer School was present in: •Pilsen, Czech Republic (2005) •Riga, Latvia (2007) •Barcelona, Spain (2009) •Canterbury, United Kingdom (2011) •Vienna, Austria (2013) •Lisbon, Portugal (2015) In general, the EFRJ Summer School aims at bringing together practitioners, researchers, trainers and other professionals interested in RJ from across Europe and beyond to exchange and discuss practices, ideas, challenges, projects in the field of RJ.

Counterterrorism (CT) and Applied Intelligence Course (The Hague, April 2017)

On 26-28 April 2017 Lowlands Solutions Netherlands (LSN) will be presenting a three-day, 24 hours, course on Counterterrorism (CT) and Applied Intelligence at the Park Hotel in The Hague, Netherlands. This three day (24 hour) “hands-on” program will provide the attendee with a comprehensive overview of the phenomenon of terrorism, basic counterterrorism techniques and the fundamental difference between information and (applied) intelligence in which focus will be given to Financial Intelligence (dr. Nicholas Ridley), Cyber Security & Cyber Intelligence and Intelligence Analysis (IA). Who Should Attend? Law Enforcement Personnel, (Military) Intelligence Officers, Security Officers, General Police Officers, Police Officers assigned to Anti-Terrorism activities, Intelligence Analysts, Financial Intelligence Officers, Academics, Security Managers, Protective Service Agents, Investigators, Threat Assessment Professionals and Corporate Managers and or CEOs.

The Open University: free course "critical criminology"

This free course, Introduction to critical criminology, provides a brief introduction to critical criminological thinking. It defines the ways in which critical criminologists take a 'critical stance' on the fundamental concepts, practices and institutions associated with crime and criminal justice systems.

Strong Cities Network

Join the first global network of mayors, municipal-level policy makers and practitioners united in building social cohesion and community resilience to counter violent extremism in all its forms. The Strong Cities Network is designed for policy-makers and practitioners operating at city, municipal or sub-national level. Membership is completely free of charge. In order to sign your city up to the Strong Cities Network you will need the approval of your Mayor.

UNODC: Education as a tool to preventing crime and promoting a culture of lawfulness

13 February 2017 - The integration of crime prevention and criminal justice into all levels of education is essential in building long-term approaches to countering crime and violence. It is also critical in ensuring that the rule of law is respected from an early age in order to build safe and prosperous societies for all. Recognizing this, the Doha Declaration, adopted at the 13th United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice, highlighted the fundamental importance of universal education for children and youth to prevent crime, terrorism and corruption and promote sustainable development. To put the Doha Declaration into reality, an ambitious Global Programme was launched last year with the financial support of the State of Qatar, which includes an innovative and comprehensive educational initiative: 'Education for Justice' (E4J). An interactive session on primary education at the Expert Group Meeting for the Education for Justice (E4J) initiativeAs part of the development of E4J, a series of Expert Group Meetings are currently underway in Vienna, bringing together experts with a variety of backgrounds from across Governments (including Ministries of Education), civil society, academia, the private sector and international organizations, combining a rich spectrum of experiences. Their areas of expertise range from education (teaching and curriculum development) to UNODC's mandate areas (corruption, terrorism, criminal justice, and organized crime, including cybercrime) With a focus on three levels of education - primary, secondary and tertiary - the meetings are being held over the course of February and March. At the primary level, E4J aims to develop and support interactive and innovative tools to foster integrity and skills from an early age for solving basic moral and ethical dilemmas; at the secondary level, the initiative will promote an understanding of the basic concepts that lie at the core of UNODC's work; while for universities, teaching and research on issues related to the UNODC-mandated areas will be facilitated and promoted, including corruption, organized crime, trafficking in persons, smuggling of migrants, terrorism, cybercrime, criminal justice and arms trafficking, as well as on integrity and ethics. Candice Welsch, from UNODC's Corruption and Economic Crime Branch, on the primary education Expert Group Meeting. Photo: UNODCNoting this, Candice Welsch from UNODC's Corruption and Economic Crime Branch, opened the primary education Expert Group Meeting: "Education is broadly recognized as a tool to promote peace, justice and equality for sustainable development. It has a major role to play in shaping the values of future generations, building collective consciousness, reshaping societal preferences and complementing this with the necessary skills to enact these values." She also elaborated how E4J is connected to the Sustainable Development Goals, specifically SDG target 4.7, which calls for Member States to engage in education on the promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence. John Brandolino, UNODC Director of the Division for Treaty Affairs. Photo: UNODCThe secondary level event was opened by John Brandolino, UNODC Director of the Division for Treaty Affairs, who conveyed the importance of building resilience among children and youth through carefully targeted and comprehensive educational programmes that actively involve young people and all relevant stakeholders. "E4J focuses on certain aspects of education that are meant to cultivate critical thinking skills among youth and build an awareness that crime is bad and harmful to society. This, in turn, should inspire individuals to abstain from criminal activities and also instil support for societal efforts to prevent and address all types of crime."

UNODC: World Drug Report 2016

The World Drug Report 2016 is published in the wake of the landmark moment in global drug policy, the special session of the General Assembly on the world drug problem. Chapter I provides a global overview of the supply of and demand for opiates, cocaine, cannabis, amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) and new psychoactive substances (NPS), as well as their impact on health. It also reviews the scientific evidence on polydrug use, treatment demand for cannabis and developments since the legalization of cannabis for recreational use in some parts of the world. Chapter II focuses on the mechanisms of the interaction between the world drug problem and all aspects of sustainable development through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals.

New UNESCO Report on School Violence and Bullying to be released at International Symposium on issue affecting millions worldwide

13 January 2017 Millions of girls and boys suffer school-related violence every year, according to a new report by UNESCO and the Institute of School Violence Prevention at Ewha Womans University (Seoul, Republic of Korea). Thirty-four per cent of students aged 11–13 reported being bullied in the previous month, with eight per cent reporting daily bullying, according to data from 19 low and middle-income countries analysed in the School Violence and Bullying: Global Status Report [1]. The report will be presented on 17 January at an international meeting in Seoul, the International Symposium on School Violence and Bullying: From Evidence to Action, aiming to support global efforts to ensure that all children and adolescents benefit from the fundamental right to education in a safe learning environment. The event is co‐organized by UNESCO and the Institute of School Violence Prevention at Ewha Womans University. “School violence and bullying is a grave violation of the right to education,” says the Director-General of UNESCO, Irina Bokova, adding that “the symposium and report are part of UNESCO’s effort to ensure that schools and other learning environments are safe and secure for all.” School violence and bullying, which includes physical, psychological and sexual harassment, is found to have a negative impact on students’ learning, as well as their mental and emotional health. A range of studies, cited in a recent UNESCO evidence review [2], shows that children and young people who have experienced homophobic bullying are at increased risk of stress, anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, isolation, self-harm and suicidal thoughts. The Global Status Report highlights that school-related violence is driven by unequal power dynamics often reinforced by gender norms and stereotypes, sexual orientation, and other factors that contribute to marginalization such as poverty, ethnic identity, or language. In a 2016 opinion poll on the experience of bullying to which 100,000 young people in 18 countries responded [3], 25 per cent reported that they had been bullied because of their physical appearance, 25 per cent because of their gender or sexual orientation and 25 per cent because of their ethnicity or national origin. The Report recommends priority actions to address school violence and bullying, notably strengthening leadership, promoting awareness, establishing partnerships and engaging children and adolescents, building education staff capacity, establishing reporting systems and improving the collection data and evidence.

Publication: Protection against Discrimination in Germany. A Guide for Refugees and New Immigrants

Every person is protected from discrimination on grounds of race, ethnic origin, gender, disability, religion, belief or philosophy of life, age, or sexual orientation. Discrimination means treating one person worse than another person due to, for instance a disability they have or their origin. This protection applies regardless of residence status. This protection is based on Germany’s General Equal Treatment Act (Allgemeines Gleichbehandlungsgesetz). It prohibits discrimination mainly in the world of work and daily affairs, such as going to a discotheque or renting housing. The Federal Anti-Discrimination Agency provides you with confidential counselling free of charge. It can also help you to find a counselling centre close to where you live: +49 (0) 30 18555-1865 (Mo–Fr: 9:00–12:00 a.m. and 1:00 –3:00 p.m.) You can also find an anti-discrimination counselling centre near you by using the counselling centre search option. The tasks of the Anti-Discrimination Agency also include research and public relations. For new immigrants and refugees, they have compiled useful information covering the various aspects of life in the brochure “Protection against Discrimination in Germany”.